Trans Day of Visibility 2020

Cameron

Cameron

Cameron

A white person wearing a blue printed top and orange shorts stands on a beach with their arms spread

'When I first considered that I might not be a woman, I was terrified it meant I'd have to change my personality and stop wearing colourful clothes. It sounds trivial, but buying short-sleeved men's shirts, with exciting plant prints, has helped me figure out that I can be non-binary transmasculine, and still myself.'

Ramses

Cameron

Cameron

The head and shoulders of a black man in a white shirt. He is bald with a chinstrap beard.

'It’s important for me to continue to be visible.  Visibility means I show up for myself, an act of self-love. '

Zhi

Cameron

Miles

A man with light brown skin and dark brown skin reclines on a colourful sofa, looking at the camera.

'We have a variety of options, you know, a whole list of different genders that you can be. There's a whole spectrum of different ways of being your gender. You don't have to be obviously male or female, which I understand is non binary. There’s so many, I don’t know how many there are. And that's awesome. And so, for me, I feel like I've decided, okay this masculinity one is a good fit. I just went straight for that kind of good fit, and I’m really happy I decided to go on this journey which is still a journey.'


Photo credit: Anthony Luvera

Read the full interview on the Wellcome Collection's site.

Miles

Sujay and Erick

Miles

A white person with glasses and brown hair smiles while about to remove a Jenga piece.

'Transitioning has allowed me to be more confident in who I am and what I like. Being out and proud can be a challenge sometimes but it’s always worth it. I’m lucky to have met so many other amazing people within the trans community - we’re all so different but we are all great in our own ways!'

Sujay and Erick

Sujay and Erick

Sujay and Erick

A white person stands with their arm around a person with brown skin in front of a tall green hedge.

'We're always visible in public for being an interracial couple and a gay couple, but for us, it's also really important to be visible as a Trans couple, especially a Transmasc for Transmasc couple'

Ash

Sujay and Erick

Sujay and Erick

image11

'I came out in November 2018 and made this collage as a form of art therapy. I wanted to capture the pain of my dysphoria with the medical imagery, but also the joy with the bright colours and fruit. Each of the characters helped me realise who I am, either by giving me a model of masculinity to try for myself or by giving me narrative frameworks by which to understand my gender.'